Our House: Warren-De-Tabley Arms (Bells of Peover)

Warren-De-Tabley Arms

This week’s blog post is on the Warren-De-Tabley Arms, now known as the Bells of Peover. The pub was named after the local Lord of the Manor, most likely George Fleming Warren, 2nd Baron de Tabley (1811-1887). When the picture on the above postcard was taken, the pub was the home of the Bell family, who would reside at the address for over 65 years!

The pub opened in 1839, and the first occupants appear to be Peter Toft and his wife. Following Peter’s death in 1846, his wife took over the pub for a couple of years before a local sawyer named George Bell took over the occupancy in 1849 – a year after his marriage to Phoebe Whittaker.

George Bell married Phoebe Whittaker in 1848 at the church in Nether Peover

It is not clear if George Bell had any experience of running pubs. However, the venture proved so successful that by the 1860s, his brothers had joined the business, and they had a dozen pubs, each serving their own ‘Bell’ brew.

The 1871 Census reveals that George and his wife Phoebe had three children; William, Elizabeth and George, who all helped in the family business. Alongside brewing and selling beer, George was also Sexton of St Oswald’s Church, which he held for 50 years.

George remained at the pub until his death on 16th May 1898. The local newspaper reported that he died in his 80th year after a short illness.

Alderley & Wilmslow Advertiser

Only a week after his death, Phoebe sadly died. She was buried in the same plot as her husband in St Oswald’s Church.

The grave of George and Phoebe Bell in St Oswald’s Church

Following George’s death, his son William took over the pub and the brewery. William was born in 1848. In 1878, he married Alma Percival in Runcorn, and the couple went on to have ten children. William had a passion for cycling and motorcars. During his time at the Warren-De-Tabley Arms, he transformed the pub into a premier destination venue for cyclists and motor enthusiasts.

William was also part of the Tabley Troop of the Earl of Chester’s Yeomanry; he served with them for 21 years. He was also an excellent swordsman and won numerous awards in the sport – including two cups from the Duke of Westminster.

The 1901 census reveals that two of the Bell children (Arthur and William) are employed in the business. Two of their other children (Gilbert and George) are employed in a solicitors and a bank. The rest of the children are still at school.

Fanny Percival Bell & Walter Ormerod

In 1908, the couple’s oldest daughter, Fanny Percival, marries Walter Ormerod and the pair settle in Bowden, Altrincham. Only a year after the wedding, Fanny tragically committed suicide by shooting herself. She was only 20 years old. She is buried in the family church of St Oswald’s. Tragically, her husband Walter could not get over his wife’s death. On 28th December 1909, while in Southport, he used his gun license to purchase a gun. He then took a seat on the pier and shot himself, dying instantly.

London Evening Standard (29 December 1909)

By the 1911 census, William Bell had also died. The pub and brewery was now being run by William’s wife Alma and their son Victor.

Alma Bell continued to run the business for another four years when another tragic event shook the family. On 25th March 1915, Victor Bell took his own life. The day before his death, he kept asking his mother to go away with him, saying he couldn’t stay at the pub. Later that evening, Alma stayed with him while he went asleep. However, in the night, he started asking his mother to go away with him again. She stayed with him until 5.30am when he got up and washed. He left the house at just past 7.30am, telling his mother he was going for a walk. Alma saw him leave the house and head over towards the church. At about 7.45am, he called at a friends house and borrowed a bicycle. Sometime later, a porter named Samuel Hatton was riding to work, when he spotted an overcoat, cap and jacket in a field. He entered the field and saw a man standing in an upright position in a pit with water was passing over the crown of his head. Hatton went and got help, and they managed to pull the body from the pit. The body was later identified as Victor Bell. He was buried with his father and sister in St Oswald’s Church.

The death hit Alma hard. It was reported that she was too ill to attend the inquest. The day after Victor’s death, she announced she was retiring, and the pub was passed back to the owner, Captain Leicester Warren. 

St Oswald’s Church, Lower Peover

Over the next few years, the Warren-De-Tabley Arms had several different proprietors, including Sydney Frank Cake, who was an acting Sergeant Major during WWI. In the late 1920s, the pub was in the hands of the Blackshaw family and from the mid-1930s, the pub had a new licensee; George Savage and his wife, Victoria. George dies not long after taking over the pub, however, his wife Victoria carries on managing the hotel during WWII. The 1939 Register reveals that Victoria is living at the address with her two daughters Joan and Phoebe. It was during this period that the Warren-De-Tabley Arms changes its name to the Bells of Peover Hotel.

Surprisingly, in 1941, Joan sued her mother and sister over a car accident. Phoebe was driving her mother’s car when she crashed into a lorry, killing a passenger named Viola Edwards and injuring her sister, who was also present in the vehicle. According to Phoebe, she was driving at 30 mph, when the lorry appeared in front of her. She braked sharply and turned the car, but they failed to miss the lorry. She stated that it had no rear light – this was disputed in court. Joan argued that she sustained a permanent scar that would seriously prejudice her opportunities in the theatrical and film profession. The judge ruled that Phoebe Savage was negligent in failing to keep a ‘proper look out’, and her mother was also negligent as she owned the car. The family of Viola Edwards was awarded £4000, and Joan was awarded £1100.

Joan Savage on the stage

Joan was not the only actor to spend a night at the Bells of Peover. By the 1960s, visitors to the pub included General Eisenhower; General Patten; Vivien Leigh and comedian Leslie Henson. 

Viven Leigh

‘Our House’: White Hart Hotel, Cheadle, Stockport

For my last week in Stockport before we move onto pastures new, I have decided to stick with the pub theme. Therefore, this week’s Our House blog is a postcard of the White Hart in Cheadle. Sadly, the postcard was never sent, so I don’t have a date for the image.

The pub is situated in Cheadle, formally called Cheadle Buckley. Cheadle is now part of Stockport, however, it used to be part of the Macclesfield Hundred. In the thirteenth century, the Lord of Cheadle was Geoffrey De Dutton who acquired it by marriage to an heiress of the ‘Cheadle’ family. The whole of the manor was eventually obtained by the Bulkeley family – think back to last week’s blog on the Warren Bulkeley. After the death of James Viscount Bulkeley, the manor was sold to Rev. Thomas Egerton in 1756. In 1806, it was sold again to John Worthington.

Some of the earliest sources that I find that mention the hotel are adverts from the mid-eighteenth century. The adverts are promoting auction lots that were coming up at the pub.

Manchester Mercury (1789)

The first proprietor that I find at the hotel is John Downes and his wife Elizabeth. They are running the White Hart in the second half of the eighteenth century. By the start of the nineteenth century a man named John Davies was the proprietor. Davies was born in 1756 and died in 1816. Following his death, his wife Mary took over the pub.

Sometime in the early 1830s, the Parkinson family moved into the White Hart. During their time at the pub, it appeared in the local press as part of a daring highways robbery trial. The events began on 20th January 1843, when an organ grinder named George Coppock visited a pub in Salford. Coppock was asked by the landlord John Brough, if he would provide the pub with an organ at a reasonable price. Coppock agreed, and told the landlord that he one in Stockport. Brough and another man in the pub called Joseph Cantrill, decided to go with Coppock to Stockport to look at the organ. When the men reached Levenshulme, it was just after nine o’clock at night. They decided to stop in Levenshulme and visited the Pack Horse pub.

The Pack Horse pub, Levenshulme (1970s) © Manchester Libraries M50196

As soon as they left the pub, one of the men knocked Coppock to the ground and covered his eyes. Cantrill then cut Coppocks pocket from his coat which contained five sovereigns, eight half-crowns and some silver. Once the men had left, Coppock managed to get back to the Pack Horse and raise the alarm. The following day, the houses of both men were raided and it was found that they had new clothes and a sovereign. Mr Parkinson, manager of the White Hart, testified that the night of the robbery the two men stayed at the hotel. They asked him to keep safe five sovereigns and eight half-crowns, which he did and returned the money to them the following day. At a subsequent trial, both men were found guilty and sentenced to ten years transportation.

Seven years after the trial, William Leigh takes over the hotel. He lives at the address with his wife Ellen and five children.

1851 Census of England

In 1860, the pub is featured in the Cheshire Directory. The Directory states that Cheadle Buckley, was a ‘populous and well-built village’. In 1851, there were 1,147 houses occupied by 5,489 inhabitants. The proprietor of the pub at this time was Ann Hargreaves.

By 1861, the pub had changed hands again. The census that year revealed that Edward Anderson, his wife Sarah Annie and their two children, alongside three servants and a cook, are all living at the address. This is the only census that the Anderson family appear at the White Hart. Three years after the census was taken Edward Anderson died. He was only 34 years old.

The next proprietor was James Evans. Before taking over the White Hart, he had been the borough surveyor for Salford. Evan’s was born in 1804 in Somerset. By 1851, he was a widower living in Salford.

The grave of James Evans who died in 1869

James was only the proprietor for a few years. Sadly in 1869, he passed away. On the day of his funeral, his coffin was carried from the White Hart and into the church next door. Present at the funeral was Evan’s old Newfoundland dog, who stayed inside the church for the service and then was at the graveside for the committal. A local newspaper reported that the dog regularly visited Evan’s grave.

The next proprietor was William Atkinson Thornton, who was born in Manchester in 1840. In 1865, he married Elizabeth Wagstaff at St John’s Church in Manchester. It appears that Thornton was the proprietor of the hotel twice; first in the early 1870s and then again in the 1880s.

Midway through the 1870s, William Thornton had moved back to Manchester and was running the Alton House Hotel.

Manchester Evening News (1875)

Also during the 1870s, Thornton became a Freemason. He was 29 years old. He was a member of the Devonshire Lodge from 1871 to 1887.

By 1881, William Thornton and his family had left Manchester and were back at the White Hart. They are now employing three servants; Sarah Chesters, a general servant; George Stoodley, a groom and Mary Weaver who was a barmaid.

Mary Weaver was born in Manchester in 1857. In 1881, Weaver appeared in the local press when a butcher from Gatley named Charles Mallison was charged with assaulting her. It appears that Mallison was already drunk when he arrived at the White Hart. While he was in the bar, he approached Mary and put his arm around her waist. He then ‘used expressions which Miss Weaver thought very unbecoming’. Mary told him that she would not stand for that kind of behaviour and threw him out of the pub. Mallison left, but returned again a short time later and refused to leave. He was then apprehended and charged with assault, being drunk and refusing to ‘quit the house’. Mallison was subsequently found guilty and was ordered to pay 20s plus costs for the assault, and 10s plus costs for refusing to leave the hotel.

During the 1880s, the hotel was heavily associated with Manchester’s theatre scene. This is because Thornton was also a theatrical animal trainer. It is likely that he trained the famous ‘Monsieur Paulo’s performing dog troop’ and that is why he stayed at the White Hart.

Manchester Evening News (1882)
The Stage (1884)

In the autumn of 1884, Thornton was given a gift by a Captain Harrington. The gift was none other than a ‘gorilla monkey’. Thornton had trained the monkey to do tricks and become somewhat ‘domesticated’. However, in March 1885, the ‘gorilla’ escaped from its cage. One of the hotel waiters was sent to catch him, however, the monkey (apparently) didn’t recognise the waiter and attacked him. His screams, attracted the attention of Thornton who came rushing to his aid. The monkey then turned on Thornton, inflicting a deep wound on his face. Thornton put his hand up to protect himself. Seeing his hand, the monkey lunged and bit off the top of one of his fingers. The monkey was eventually caught and was put to sleep.

Thornton also exported show dogs aboard. In 1889, a fox terrier that he had purchased from the dog loving Sir Humphrey de Trafford, which was due to be sent to Brussels, was stolen from the White Hart. Thornton offered a sizeable reward of £5 for its return.

Sadly, in 1885, William Thornton’s wife Elizabeth died. Every year, on the anniversary of her death, her husband took out a memorandum in the local newspaper.

Manchester Evening News 1904

Two years after her death, an inquest was held at the White Hart. The deceased was a man named Edward Laycock, who was a department manager at A. & S, Henry & co. He lived in Cheadle with his with his sister and niece. Apparently, the day before his death, he had gone to work as normal, returning home at 2pm. He then remained at home and to bed at 10pm. When Laycock’s niece went to give him cup of tea the following morning, she found blood splattered around the room and her uncle was dead in his bed. After hearing all the evidence, the jury at the inquest ruled that Laycock had died from a burst blood vessel.

In 1898, the hotel appeared in the press when a local man named Henry Nadin stole a bicycle from one of the sheds. Two other bikes were also stolen in Cheadle at the same time. It appears that Nadin swopped some of the parts of the bicycles in a bid to make them unrecognisable. He then tried to sell the altered bikes in Didsbury.

An early image of the White Hart

By 1890, William’s son, also called William Atkinson Thornton, had moved out of the pub and was living in Manchester. In 1895, he married Olivia Armstrong. At the time of the marriage, the couple were living at same address on Long Millgate.

The 1901 Census reveals that William Atkinson Thornton (Jnr) and his family had moved to Cheadle. They had their own house on Hall Street. William (Jnr) was helping his father manage the pub and his wife Olivia was raising their children. Olivia appears to have constantly been pregnant during her child bearing years. The 1911 Census reveals that she had given birth to nine children, with one child sadly dying before adulthood. The age gap between her two youngest children, appears to have been just short of a year. She must have been knackered!! The census also reveals that the house William (Jnr) and his family were living in was a two-up two-down terrace. The family of eleven lived and slept in only four rooms.

On the same 1901 census, William Thornton (Snr) is still at the White Hart. Also at the address is his daughter, Lillian Maud, and three general servants. The 1911 Census reveals that the Hotel had approximately 14 rooms. It also shows that William (Snr) is still managing the pub at the age of 69. His daughter Lilian is now 22 years old and is unmarried. Sadly, it further shows that William actually had three children, with one sadly dying before 1911.

Eight years after the 1911 census, William Atkinson Thornton (Snr) died. He was 77 years old. In his Will he left a large estate worth £5,479 8s 11d.

In 1919, Joseph Adamson took over the pub. Adamson was from Bolton and for the previous two-and-a-half years had managed the St James Hotel in Bolton. Adamson was still at the White Hart at the start of WWII. He died in 1943 at his home on Hall Grove. He was 68 years old. He left behind his wife Sarah Ann Adamson.

An early postcard of the White Hart verses what it looks like in 2020. © Michala Hulme

‘Our House’: Warren Bulkeley Arms Hotel, Stockport

This week’s postcard has the Warren Bulkeley Arms Hotel in Stockport on the front of it. The Warren Bulkeley was named in honour of Viscount Warren Bulkeley (1752-1822), who was the son-in-law of Stockport landowner Sir George Warren. Warren had built the first water-powered cotton mill in Stockport.

Viscount Warren Bulkeley (1752-1822)

The picture you see on the front of this week’s postcard is not actually the original building. The original building was situated on Warren Street and was built sometime at the end of the eighteenth century.

An 1897 map of Stockport showing the location of the pub

At the latter end of the nineteenth century, the original Warren Bulkeley Inn was demolished and a new one was built on the corner of George Street and Warren Street.

Just a small point, the Warren Bulkeley Arms is called an inn in the early/mid-nineteenth century and then by the end of the nineteenth century it is called a hotel. I will use the same terminology as per the source material, however, I just wanted to make it clear in case it gets a little confusing.

Like the White Lion, which was the subject of last week’s blog, the Warren Bulkeley was more than just a place that sold beer. It was also a place where bankruptcies were heard, it was an auction house, a meeting room and even a magistrates court.

A 1813 newspaper advertisement for a ball at the Inn

The first keeper of the Warren Bulkeley Arms that I can find in the nineteenth century is William Higginson, he takes over the Inn four years before the above ball. Previously to running the Inn, William had been the keeper of the Crown and Anchor, Stockport.

William remained the proprietor of the establishment until his death in 1823. Following his death, his wife Frances took over the running of the Inn. She remained the proprietor until her son, Joseph Morton Higginson, took over in the early 1840s. Frances died in 1842. She left a sizeable sum of £1000 to her son.

Joseph was born in 1807. He was baptised on 11 October of that year at St Mary’s Church, Stockport. In 1843, he married a Manchester girl named Sarah Young Marsh.

Joseph died in 1854 and is buried at St Mary’s Church, Stockport. The next proprietors of the Inn were Charles and Mary Leah. Charles had some experience of managing inns. Before moving to the Warren Bulkeley, he had kept the Old Admiral Inn on Hillgate, Stockport.

In 1847, Charles was brought up at the Borough Court for failing to provide a soldier on military duty with a bed and room of his own. The Bench found that he should have found the man a bed to himself but not a room. He was fined 40s., which was the lowest fine he could have received.

The Old Admiral is now demolished, however, it used to stand on the corner of Middle Hillgate. This photograph was taken in 1960 by H. Lees. The only visible sign that it was a pub is the grand door
© Stockport Archives

Charles Leah appears at the address on both the 1851 and 1861 censuses. The latter census revealed that Charles employed two waiters, a barmaid, a cook and a chambermaid. Two years after the 1861 census, Charles died. He is also buried at St Mary’s Church.

A late Victorian / early Edwardian image of St Mary’s Church, Stockport.

The next keeper of the Warren Bulkeley was Phillip Mason. Phillip, his wife Jane and their eight children were from Manchester. They appear at the address on the 1871 census. A year after the census was taken the Mason family left the pub and moved to Manchester. Sadly, Jane Mason died in 1878. Two years after her death, Phillip married Rachel Syers at St Peter’s Church in Manchester. The 1881 census reveals that the couple, alongside three of Phillip’s children, are living at Broughton Bowling Club, Salford, where Phillip was a steward. By the next census, the family have left Salford and are living in North Wales, which is where they remained until Phillip’s death in 1909.

Following Phillip Mason’s departure, the next proprietor of the Warren Bulkeley was William Frederick Mitchell, who took over in 1872 and left sometime before 1877.

Now, it does appear that 1877 was not a good year for the Bulkeley, as it features several times in both the local and national press. The first time it appears in the national press is when it’s mentioned as part of a high profile divorce. Ellen Firth (nee Holdsworth) looked to divorce her husband William Frederick Mitchell (the landlord of the pub) on the grounds of adultery. Divorce in the 1870s was usually limited to the wealthy, and therefore it’s most unusual to have someone of Mitchell’s class seeking a divorce. The couple had been married since 1862. Their wedding took place at the Old Church, Halifax. Following the marriage, the couple managed the White Bull Hotel, Blackburn, where they had one son called Henry Holdsworth Mitchell. As mentioned above, in 1872, William left his wife and son to run the Warren Bulkeley. It was alleged by his wife and servants that worked at the establishment, that William was having an affair with a woman named Annie Stott. It transpired that the servants in the pub actually thought that Annie was his wife.

A copy of William Frederick Mitchell’s and Ellen Holdsworth’s marriage certificate

Ellen was granted her separation from William and she also got custody of the couple’s son. Following the divorce, Ellen remained in Blackburn running the Old Bull Hotel – I think that this is a different pub from the White Bull that she had managed previously. What William did after the separation is not as clear. I know that he left Stockport in 1877. I could not find him on the next (1881) census, however, a person with the same name, same year of birth and same place of birth, appears on the 1891 census living in Liverpool. I therefore think that William left Stockport, moved to Liverpool and took up a new occupation as an undertaker. He also went on to remarry; his new wife was called Emily and she was 20 years his junior. He also became a father again, as the couple went on to have four children. Sadly, (maybe not so much if you were his ex-wife), William died a year after the 1891 census was taken.

One thing that all the landlords mentioned in this blog have in common is that they were all Freemasons. Charles Leah joined in 1852 and it seems that William joined in 1872. Throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the pub was a regular meeting place for the secretive group. James Henry Firth, who was the next keeper of the hotel, was also a Mason. He joined in 1876. They were also all members of the Peace Lodge and it is likely that knew each other.

James, his wife Elizabeth Jane Firth (nee Goodale), and his children; Nellie, Sarah, Annie, Tom and Atkinson, had moved to Stockport from Salford, where James had his own shop on Regent Road.

On 27 July 1877, the local newspaper reported that James had helped catch a conman who was travelling around pubs in Stockport and was taking money from landlords under false pretences. By the time he arrived at the Warren Bulkeley, he had stolen money from four other landlords. When the conman got to the door of the pub, clearing knowing that it was a meeting place for Freemasons, he gave James the Freemason’s sign for ‘help’. However, something did not sit right with the landlord so he asked the conman a Freemason’s question, which he got wrong. Convinced he was an imposter, the conman was reported and then taken into custody, where it was revealed that his name is John Dunn. At his trial, it came out that he had visited 14 other pubs, where his request for money had been denied. Also at his trial, he gave his address as a place in Manchester, which turned out to be a warehouse. Dunn did eventually plead guilty to his crimes and was sentenced to six months and two days in Knutsford gaol.

Knutsford Prison

Also in 1877, the Warren Bulkeley appeared in the newspaper again because of a drunken customer. Michael Heaneghan had been drinking in the pub and had got himself into a bit of state. James asked him to leave but Heaneghan refused. The police were called and the drunken man ended up in front of a judge at Stockport Borough Court, where he was found guilty of the charges put before him and was fined 5s and costs.

James Firth continued to run the pub until his death in 1887. He was only 47 years old. He left an estate of £464 3s 4d. to his wife Elizabeth. Following his death, Elizabeth took over as proprietor of the public house. She remained there until her retirement, which was sometime in the late 1890s. By the 1901 census, Elizabeth had left the pub and she is living with two of her sons on Kennerley Road, Cale Green. Elizabeth died in 1929. She left a sizeable fortune of £3455 17s. to her widowed daughter Nellie Walker Bennett.

Someone between 1908 and 1909, the Warren Bulkeley was taken over by John William Habgood and his wife Florence Habgood (nee Roby). The Habgoods were from Farnworth, Lancashire. John was the son of George Habgood who was a draper from Essex. The draper business must have been a success because by the time John’s father was in his 50s, he had made enough money to live off his own means.

John William Habgood married Florence Roby on 23rd October 1897 in Radcliffe

John Habgood had several jobs throughout his working life. He was employed as a warehouseman, a milliner and ladies outfitter, and a commercial traveller dealing in tea. In 1901, John appears on the Irish census living in Dublin. It appears he is in Ireland for work. His wife Florence and father are living at the family home in Radcliffe.

In 1905, John Habgood joined the Freemasons in Rochdale. He was a member of St Chad’s Lodge. Shortly after 1908, the Habgoods left Rochdale and moved into the Warren Bulkeley. Before the Habgoods agreed to purchase the pub, a traveller named Thomas Merrell, was negotiating to buy the premises for £1000. However, Merrell turned out to be a conman and the deal fell through…

The Manchester Guardian, 1908

Shortly after taking up occupancy, John Habgood applied for planning permission to change the vault of the pub into a parlour room and a separate room where luncheons could be made. The magistrates granted the application on the condition that both the luncheon bar and the parlour would be closed on a Sunday.

The 1911 Census reveals that John and Florence didn’t have any children. It further reveals that the Habgoods were employing four servants to help with the daily tasks of running a 13 roomed hotel. It is not clear if the Habgoods were living at the Warren Bulkeley during WWI, however, by 1921, the Hopwoods have left the Warren Bulkeley and are living in Blackpool. They remained in Blackpool until John’s death in 1941.

John Habgood’s probate record

During the interwar years, the hotel is regularly used as an auction house, selling properties from around Stockport. The properties varied from small terraces to imposing Victorian villas. A large semi-detached house on the prestigious Bramhall Lane in Davenport, would set you back £430. Whereas two houses on Small Street, Hilgate cost £120.

At the start of WWII, Frederick and Rhoda Smith (nee Turner) were running the hotel. Also working at the hotel were head barman Bartholomew Heyes and domestic servant Susan Stopford. Midway through the war, Tom Grantham, his wife Gladys and two daughters, Margaret and Valerie, move into the address.

The postwar years are somewhat obscure, however, by the 1980s the Warren Bulkeley had become derelict and was demolished. The frontage was saved and is now part of a shop that is situated further up the road.

© Michala Hulme 2020